New Media Interchange

In The Field… At The Writer’s Guild of America

Tracy Pattin, Host. Sizzle in the Middle

Tracy Pattin, Host. Sizzle in the Middle

Last week I went to an excellent New Media event at the Writer’s Guild in Los Angeles, put on by New Media Interchange called, “From Camera to YouTube.” NMI’s  experts, Doug Welch and Michael Lawshe walked us through the process of creating a New Media project from initial recording to final placement on YouTube (or other video sharing sites).

Seems writers from Traditional Media are hungry to learn about this new way of distributing content. Of course, the Writer’s Strike of ’08 was all about the complicated issues around this emerging medium and how writers need to get paid what their worth and for their content. Still, it’s clear we all have to jump into this new world and participate, otherwise we could miss some great opportunities.

The evening was kicked off by the WGA’s  Elizabeth Flack, who heads up their New Media department. Then, TV writer turned college professor, Roseanne Welch gave an inspired and impassioned speech about New Media’s opportunities for pro-active writers, referencing Diablo Coty  who went from blogger to Oscar winner.

Doug Welch gave a colorful demonstration on the unique pros and cons of the different types of cameras reassuring the audience that “it’s fiddly, but not all that complicated.” From the HD Cam to the Flip Camera, looks like there are many inexpensive ways to create a web movie, webisode or web video.

The key to the production process comes down to one important component; Sound. The audio must be as clean as possible. Video can get by with less than stellar quality, but if viewers can’t hear it, they’ll tune out (or click off!).

Enter top Warner Bros., Sound Supervisor and three time Emmy award winner, Michael Lawshe. “Audio is more than 1/2 of video” Michael says, making the point that in the production phase of a project, audio needs special attention. You can make do with mediocre video but if the sound is distorted or there’s a lot of background noise, there’s very little you can do. Doug chimed in with an easy rule of (sound) thumb; ” Just don’t record noise in the first place.”

So how do you get better audio? “Know your camera” Michael points out.  He went on to talk about external microphones and camera mics.

Then, they shared the steps and tips to editing and exporting with an important tip; “Think about your shoot before you begin.” Great advice in this new era of  on-the-fly production. The more prepared you are, the less time you’ll have to spend in a dark room, editing your project.

We learned how to upload to YouTube, how to imbed and distribute through one-stop-shop sites like TubeMogul where you can share your content easily and efficiently across cyberspace.

The evening ended with audience questions. I was amazed by the amount of technical questions like which editing software is the best, which is the preferred video streaming software, sharing and tagging and more slightly geeky questions!

Impressive and telling. I think New Media has reached critical mass and the marriage of new and not-so-new media is beginning to really take shape.

The best advice in how to get up to speed with this rapidly growing and changing world of technology comes from Doug Welch; “you just have to get out there and do it.” It’s not about perfection, it’s about action.

Check out New Media Interchange for the latest news, information and events.

I’m heading back in to the field this week for more New Media and Social Media events.

-Tracy Pattin

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Filed under: In The Field, , , , , , ,

In The Field with Tracy Pattin- New Media and Social Media Travels Around LA

Tracy Pattin, Host. Sizzle in the Middle

Tracy Pattin, Host. Sizzle in the Middle

This past week has been a week of High Geekery. I went to several New Media and Social Media events, starting with Dorkbot, where I helped Doug Welch (my treasured geek mentor) record the event. I’ve found that the best way to get up to speed with all of this high geekery and changing technology is to go to lots of events and talk to as many brainiac techies as possible. You can go to New Media events every day of the week. And last week, I did.

Thanks to the Dorkbot event, I now know how to Video Stream with U-Stream (well, sort of). The afternoon was a series of speakers in various stages of high tech development, like John Arroyo’s Remix Revolution, a composer’s dream. Where the original piece of music is transformed into various versions as musicians join in, in cyberspace to add their own musical take. Then there was a chess game to music, and Jeremy Douglass’s Playpower Keyboard and even a “Haunting” technology. I had no idea there were professional haunters, devoting their time to new creations for haunted houses. As I stood at the laptop keeping an eye on the video streaming for Doug, feeling out of my element, I realized I could absorb some of this heady technology just by keeping my mind open.

The next night was the wonderful Bloblive pitching event. What is Bloblive? It’s an open-mic night for people with ideas; speed dating for ideas; a fun and engaging networking event. Each person gets 90 seconds to pitch their idea, from new software and green companies to a litany of products and services. (I pitched ReinventCamp). Then they get professional feedback from CEOs, angel investors and other entrepreneurs on why it will work or why it won’t. The rest of the audience chimes in with ideas and suggestions. Twitter is on a big screen behind where the cyberspace participants are Tweeting up a brainstorm of their own ideas. Lisa Greenfield pitched her hand analysis company, MyTruthinHand.com, then there was a green company, Useless.org, a fitness motivation iPod looking gadget, the Simon watch and many others. All in all it’s a great opportunity for ideas at all stages.

The One-Coach event at Blank Spaces was a night of Social Media with a panel of experts even one via Skype in Ohio. Nate Kievman, a Linkedin Specialist, talked about Woovertising vs. Traditional Advertising. Woovertising is where consumers gain control of the conversation and shut the traditional advertiser out. Bryce Maddock of Task Us has gained 100 clients over the past months, all through Twitter. He’s convinced this is where the money is. Then there was Traffic is Gold’s Josh Landsberg, a branding and Twitter expert, echoing Bryce Maddock’s Twitter claim. Josh recently got an appearance on a radio show in Australia because of Twitter! And finally, Social Networking Capitalist, Michelle Price of A Third Mind New Media. She talked about the Social Network business plan and empowering “Thought Leaders.” The panel all agreed that the three Social Media giants, Twitter, Facebook and Linkedin are key places to spend your time in Cyberspace. Branding was the buzzword of the evening with the accelerated growth of Social Media and the masses setting up millions of virtual storefronts. Of course YouTube is a player in all of this as well. So, the word is, Social Media is very alive and well and growing by leaps and bounds and can be a profitable endeavor.

And finally, there was the Twitter breakfast put on by Ideablob’s Erick Brownstein. I thought I was an intermediate Tweeter. Not so. More like an advanced beginner after Erick’s great presentation. Seems there are many layers to Twitter just like all those other platforms. I learned that the power of Twitter is in all the search capabilities where you can reach out and find customers in your niche as well as Tweeting about having a toasted “everything” bagel with lite veggie cream cheese from the Bagel Broker and a Vanilla Chai Latte from Coffee Bean and Tea Leaf while reading Perez Hilton’s latest Hollywood gossip stories.

I can’t end with week without sharing some traditional media experiences. The AFTRA Mastery Panel on Healing As It Relates to Performance Mastery was a fascinating evening. Ending this productive and exhilarating week was the infamous Doug Welch Friday Coffee at the Grove/ Farmer’s market.

So, stay tuned for another week of New Media, Social Media and interesting human experiences along the way. Coming up on In The Field this week: The Writer’s Guild event “From Camera to YouTube” taught by New Media Interchange’s Doug Welch and any others I find.

-Tracy Pattin

Filed under: Community, Events, In The Field, Meeting, New Media, News

Video: Dorkbot SoCal – Open Dork Show and Tell

As part of our community outreach, New Media Interchange has arranged to stream and record Dorkbot SoCal meetings and bring their speakers to viewers around the world. This video was recorded on May 15, 2009 with the assitance of NMI member, Tracy Pattin, from Sizzle in the Middle.

[blip.tv ?posts_id=2155730&dest=-1]

iPod Ready Video

Filed under: Community, Events, Live, New Media, podcast, Show, Video

Video: Dorkbot SoCal – John Arroyo

As part of our community outreach, New Media Interchange has arranged to stream and record Dorkbot SoCal meetings and bring their speakers to viewers around the world. This video was recorded on May 15, 2009 with the assitance of NMI member, Tracy Pattin, from Sizzle in the Middle.

[blip.tv ?posts_id=2154287&dest=-1]

iPod Ready Video

John Arroyo
http://www.remixin.com/

John is a composer, producer and DJ and is involved with an iterative remix project called Remixin. He will discus how music changes as it is iteratively remixed, which he calls “remix evolution”.

Filed under: Community, Elsewhere, Events, Live, New Media, podcast, Show, Video

Video: Dorkbot SoCal – Jeremy Douglass

As part of our community outreach, New Media Interchange has arranged to stream and record Dorkbot SoCal meetings and bring their speakers to viewers around the world. This video was recorded on May 15, 2009 with the assitance of NMI member, Tracy Pattin, from Sizzle in the Middle.

[blip.tv ?posts_id=2153837&dest=-1]

iPod Ready Video

Jeremy Douglass – http://www.playpower.org

People need affordable learning games. Worldwide, 4.1 billion people earn under $3,000 per year, meaning that even a $100 computer is often out of reach for the world’s emerging middle class. Playpower is targeting a $10 platform based on the 8-bit 6502 microprocessor that makes learning games affordable for “the other 90%.” Playpower designs high quality learning games, conducts field trials to confirm that they work, and fosters collaborations between game designers, cognitive scientists and NGOs.

Filed under: Community, Elsewhere, Events, Live, New Media, podcast, Show, Technology, Video

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