New Media Interchange

Video: Blogging and Content Creation with Douglas E. Welch – San Fernando Valley WordPress Group

Douglas E. Welch, writer of Careers in New Media  and several other blogs, presents on Blogging and Content Creation to the San Fernando Valley WordPress Group (54 mins)

Sfvwg presentation thumb

 

This talk contains the following topics:

  • Why you should be blogging for yourself, your career and your business?
  • Where do you find content for your blogs, podcasts and social media?
  • Capture the content that already exists in your life and work
  • Let people “behind the scenes”
  • Create “series” to make it easier to develop content
  • Read voraciously!
  • Share your content everywhere
  
 

Music: “Rocket” by Kevin MacLeod (http://incompetech.com) under Creative Commons License.

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Filed under: Blogging, New Media, podcast, Show, Video, YouTube

Video: Blogging 101: Who you follow is more important…

Part of the Blogging 101 series…

A quick tip from this 53 minute presentation — Blogging and Content Creation at the San Fernando Valley WordPress Group.

B101 who you follow
 

Previously on Blogging 101:

More information on Douglas E. Welch and Careers in New Media:

Filed under: Blogging, New Media, podcast, Show, Video, YouTube

Subscribed 46: Scott Berkun – author and speaker on creativity, leadership, philosophy

Subscribed 46: Scott Berkun

If fine myself reading and sharing a lot of content from Scott Berkun, so it only makes sense to highlight him here are part the Subscribed series. Scott’s recent article, How to overcome cynicism, was a great example. It can be easy to fall victim to to cynicism in life and business and I salute him for taking on such a chronic issue.

How do you overcome cynicism in an environment determined to maintain it?

You overcome a toxic environment by walking out the door. Unless you happen to be a powerful person in the organization, it is not your fault that the environment is cynical, broken, dysfunctional, toxic, demented, twisted or incompetent. Managers and executives are paid a great deal more than the average employee and the main thing that comes with that pay grade is accountability. If the place depresses you, look upwards: the people in power make it this way. It’s uncommon for people in power to be motivated to make big changes since they like being in power.

Read the entire article

Scott berkun

From Scott Berkun’s web site…

I’m an author and speaker. My work has appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, Forbes, The Wall Street Journal, The Economist, The Guardian, Wired magazine, National Public Radio, The Huffington Post and other media. I taught at the University of Washington, blog for Harvard Business and BusinessWeek, and have appeared as an expert on various subjects on CNN, CNBC and MSNBC.

My latest book, The Year Without Pants: WordPress.com & The Future of Work released in Sept 2013 and was named an Amazon.com best book of the year.

Read Scott’s entire biography

 Get The Year Without Pants from Amazon.com

Other books by Scott Berkun

What are some of your favorite Subscriptions? Share them here in the comments!

Previously highlighted on Subscribed:

Subscribed is a Careers in New Media series  highlighting the Podcasts, YouTube Channels and Blogs that I follow on a daily basis. Check out this entry, and past entries, for some great New Media Content — Douglas

Filed under: Blogging, Books, New Media, Subscribed

New Media Interchange: 2013 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2013 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

A San Francisco cable car holds 60 people. This blog was viewed about 1,600 times in 2013. If it were a cable car, it would take about 27 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

Filed under: Blogging, New Media, News, Wordpress

Tip: Add YouTube Subscribe badge to your site and blog posts

Originally published in Careers in New Media…

Every YouTube Producer knows how important it is to gain subscribers to their YouTube Channel. Subscribers drive the views, minutes watched and likes that help to raise their channel above the other noise on YouTube. One great way to increase your subscriber is to include an easy-to-use subscribe button alongside your video blog posts and on our blogs and web sites. It’s even easy to do.

You can create your own YouTube Subscribe button by visiting this Google Developers Page

Youtube subscribe

You’ll find a few configuration options there…

Youtube subscribe config

…and even a tool to help you create the HTML code for the button. Simply enter your channel ID (in my case, dewelch), set your size and color options and the HTML is created for you to cut and paste wherever you wish.

Youtube configure

Here are the results for my own channel.

 

Filed under: Blogging, New Media, YouTube

Subscribed 42:Garden Muse with Cindy Dyer

Subscribed 42: Garden Muse with Cindy Dyer

A lovely, regularly updated, collection of garden photography. Always something nice to happen across in my RSS feeds and usually provides more than a few ideas for my “Interesting Plant” series on A Gardener’s Notebook.

Garden muse

What are some of your favorite Subscriptions? Share them here in the comments!

Previously highlighted on Subscribed:

Subscribed is a Careers in New Media series  highlighting the Podcasts, YouTube Channels and Blogs that I follow on a daily basis. Check out this entry, and past entries, for some great New Media Content — Douglas


Filed under: Blogging, Elsewhere, New Media, Subscribed

Subscribed 41: My Garden: The RHS’s Online Community for Gardeners

Subscribed 41: My Garden: The RHS’s Online Community for Gardeners

Another great collection of gardening information in this week’s Subscribed. I regularly end up sharing and saving links to the blog posts found here. These posts come from a variety of people on a variety of topics, so there is almost always something interesting to see there.

I recently shared “New Plant Award winners at the National Plant Show” from Graham Rice. You can check out the complete lineup of blogs by visiting http://mygarden.rhs.org.uk/blogs/.

Rhs blogs

From the RHS web site…

“The Royal Horticultural Society is the UK’s leading gardening charity dedicated to advancing horticulture and promoting good gardening.” – http://mygarden.rhs.org.uk/blogs/

What are some of your favorite Subscriptions? Share them here in the comments!

Previously highlighted on Subscribed:

Subscribed is a Careers in New Media series  highlighting the Podcasts, YouTube Channels and Blogs that I follow on a daily basis. Check out this entry, and past entries, for some great New Media Content — Douglas


Filed under: Blogging, Elsewhere, New Media, Subscribed

Join the Dog Days of Podcasting – 30 Day Podcasting Challenge – Starts July 30th, 2013

Fellow Friends in Tech member, Kreg Steppe started the first Dog Days of Podcasting Challenge in 2012, as a way to kickstart his own podcasting efforts. I missed that announcement, but I am jumping on board for this years challenge and you should too! What a great way to try out new styles, new shows, new ideas and generally get your podcasting feet moving!

Join the Dog Days of Podcasting Challenge!

From the Dog Days of Podcasting web site…

What is the Dog Days of Podcasting?

Essentially, it is a challenge to do a podcast for 30 days in a row.

In 2012 Kreg Steppe was looking to give himself a little push in regards to recording his own personal podcast since he wasn’t recording it very often. That turned into a challenge for himself to record a show everyday for 30 days believing that after 30 days it would turn into a habit. Once it was mentioned to Chuck Tomasi he took the challenge too and they decided it would be a great idea to record starting 30 days before Dragon*Con, culminating with the last episode where they would record it together when they saw each other there.

Turns out there were some of our friends that also wanted to get in on the action and took the challenge too. So it grew into a challenge 7 of us took.

This year we are inviting more podcasters to get in on the action. Keep in mind, it’s a fun challenge, and you will not be shamed (too much) if you don’t record every 30 day. It is kind of like the way Drew Carey describes “Whose line is it anyway?”. A fun game were we earn points, but the points don’t matter.

What matters is that we all have fun recording and listening to each other.

Start Date: July 30th, 2013 End Date: August 30th, 2013 Rules: Podcast Once a day for 30 days. Show length is up to you. Most vary from 3 – 5 Min.I’ll be posting my daily shows here during the challenge, but I will also be including my usual podcast selection as part of the 30 days, so you should see podcasts on careers, new media, gardening, technology and more!

Filed under: Audio, Blogging, Elsewhere, Events, New Media, New Media Challenge, News, podcast, podcasting, Show

Subscribed 37: Podcast Community on Facebook

Subscribed 037: Podcast Community on Facebook

This week’s Subscribed entry is a bit of a departure as it isn’t a podcast, YouTube Channel or blog, but rather a Facebook community dedicate to Podcasting. The Podcast Community has nearly 800 members and a depth of new media information not found in many other places.

The Podcast Community is a place for questions and discussions, not just announcements of upcoming shows and guests. If you have a new media question, this is one of the best places to get it answered. You’ll find a wide variety of advice, guidance and support in this community.

Podcast community

What are some of your favorite Subscriptions? Share them here in the comments!

Previously highlighted on Subscribed:

Subscribed is a Careers in New Media series  highlighting the Podcasts, YouTube Channels and Blogs that I follow on a daily basis. Check out this entry, and past entries, for some great New Media Content — Douglas


Filed under: Blogging, New Media, Subscribed

Subscribed 36: The Rusted Vegetable Garden with Gary Pilarchik

Subscribed 36: The Rusted Vegetable Garden with Gary Pilarchik

Both a blog and YouTube Channel, Gary provides a wealth of gardening information. I subscribe to both the blog and the YouTube Channel, although I discovered him through his channel first. I find myself making lots of notes when I watch his videos. I am trying to grow more vegetables her in my garden and I find that my 40 year old knowledge of vegetable gardening can be quite lacking sometimes. It is great to have a straightforward demos and advice to turn to when I need a refresher.

Subscribe to Gary’s YouTube Channel

What are some of your favorite Subscriptions? Share them here in the comments!

Previously highlighted on Subscribed:

Subscribed is a Careers in New Media series  highlighting the Podcasts, YouTube Channels and Blogs that I follow on a daily basis. Check out this entry, and past entries, for some great New Media Content — Douglas

Filed under: Blogging, New Media, Subscribed, YouTube

Video: New Media Tip – Scheduling Blog Posts with WordPress and Blogger

Sometimes it can be useful to schedule blog posts to go out on a specific date and time. For example, you might be on vacation or away from your office, but still want that content to go out. Both WordPress and Blogger provide support for scheduled posts and this video shows how to use it.

 CINM thumb scheduling

 Can’t see the video above? Watch “New Media Tip – Scheduling Blog Posts with WordPress and Blogger” on my YouTube Channel.

Watch more New Media videos in this New Media Playlist

Recent New Media Tips…

Filed under: Blogging, New Media, podcast, podcasting, Show, Software, Technology, Video, YouTube

My Favorite New Media Things for April 2013 – Douglas E. Welch

My Favorite Things

As always, let me know what types of interesting items you would like to see and I will keep an eye out for them especially. — Douglas

Links to all of these items, and more, are on my Pinterest Feed.

Follow Me on Pinterest

Filed under: Blogging, Hardware, My Favorite Things, New Media, podcasting, Software, Technology

New Media Prescription: Your blog’s editorial calendar starts with your personal calendar

In my New Media Consulting business, I am often asked, “How do I get started? What should I blog about? When should I do it?” With most clients, the first place to start in developing some sort of editorial calendar for a blog begins with their very own personal calendar. The milestones in your calendar — those important events — are the beginning of any great blog.

While most people see their calendar as a reminder of upcoming events, each item on your calendar can and should drive various new media activities, as well. There are blog posts to be written and published weeks or even months ahead of the event itself. With such a ready supply of “content” for your blog, why not start here?

Both readers and search engines love a regular flow of content from blogs, podcasts and YouTube Channels. It will make them return again and again. It will lead them to subscribe to your mailing lists, RSS Feeds and Channels. When they do this, they are giving you permission to enter into their lives whenever you have something interesting to say. Do not abuse this permission, but also do not ignore their desire for new information, new content, new videos, etc.

Calendar

The Calendar Blog Process

If you want to get started with your blog — or add more content to an existing blog — here is a process I use. It all begins with my calendar.

Find the next immediate event on your calendar that you want to share with others. For this event, and subsequent events, do most or all of these steps.

  • Look back 1 month, 1 week and 1 day before the event and place calendar reminders to post event information to your blog on these days.
  • Create blog posts noting these events. Included further information as it becomes available closer to the event
    • If possible, pre-write your blog posts and schedule them to automatically post on the appropriate day.
    • If the event is a ticketed/RSVP event, note when ticket sales and registration begin
      • It is as important to post this information, at this time, as the information/date of the actual event, as people may need to purchase tickets/RSVP quickly.
      • Create a blog post describing the event and linking to the Ticket/RSVP page
      • Post (or schedule the post) to appear on your blog 1 day before tickets go on sale or the RSVP list opens. (Watch this blog for an upcoming video on how to schedule posts for WordPress and Blogger blogs)
    • If your event is not ticketed, publish your first post about the event at least 1 month ahead or sooner if possible.
      • Typically this post is in the form of a “Save the Date” post with as many details as you can provide ahead of time.
  • Share photos, video and links from previous similar events, if you attended in the past
    • Remember to collect as much content as possible during each event, so that you have plenty of content to include for subsequent occurrences
  • Repeat this for every event in your calendar, creating a constant schedule of calendar items to drive regular posts on your blog and promote your activities.
    • Make a point of including these blog posting dates (1 month, 1 week, 1 day before) for each event as you add it to your calendar.
    • “Working in Reverse” will insure that you do not “forget” to promote your events in the future.
  • Schedule Followup Posts
    • Add an event to your calendar NO MORE THAN 1 WEEK, after. Post photos, videos and a recap of the event for those that could not attend.
      • General Rule: The longer photos and video stay in your camera, the LESS LIKELY you will be to post them
      • Followup recaps are, in some ways, even more important than the pre-event announcements, as they contain information and content for those who could not attend the actual event, as well as reminders of the information for those that did.
      • Recaps allow attendees to easily share your content with their audience. This allows you to effect an even wider audience.

Further Notes:

  • A badly promoted event is a waste of time for you and everyone involved
    • This is especially true if you are not being paid for the event. In these cases, promotion of yourself and your work may be the only payment you receive. Don’t squander this opportunity by failing to promote well.
    • Sometimes you may need to do the majority of the promotion if the event organizers do not promote it fully. It is in your own best interest to do so, even though it is extra work. Don’t rely on organizers.
  • Promote your events and activities — even if the public cannot attend — so that your blog readers can at least see and hear about your work
    • Post photos, video and notes about these events/share as much as you can
    • Give your readers a look “behind the scenes” whenever you can. This is very popular content for most readers.
  • Promote your colleagues and friends events using these methods and ask them to do the same with yours
    • When someone shares your content, they are willingly providing you access to their entire network. This often includes people who are unfamiliar with your work.
    • Everyone involved with an event should make a point to promote everyone else involved in that event. It greatly expands the audience exposed to your promotion.
    • Create pre-written blog posts, social media messages that people can cut and paste, ReTweet or Share. Reducing the work/friction involved in sharing makes it more likely that people will share your message.

It should be obvious that events are time sensitive. Do not miss the opportunity to fully promote your events. Put your promotion milestones in your calendar with as much importance as the event itself. Otherwise you may find yourself putting out great effort for very little reward.

Use this link for more posts in the New Media Prescription series


Filed under: Blogging, New Media, New Media Prescription, Social

Subscribed 32: Joy the Baker

Subscribed 32: Joy the Baker

Another great source of recipes for my never-ending desire for great cookie recipes — along with other recipes I can put to use in my own life. Joy the Baker always turns of a regular supply. I recently shared this Joy the Baker recipe for Honey Chamomile Soda that I came across a week or so ago. I am planning on trying to make a sparkling version of it when I have a few moments.

Joy the baker

Here’s how Joy describes herself…

“I’m Joy. I’m a baker. Had you guessed as much?

I’m currently hurtling into my thirties, trying to show the world, and my kitchen, what’s what.

I’m a self taught/ family taught/ taste buds taught baker.

I grew up in the kitchen in between my father, who makes a mean Sweet Potato Pie, and my mother, who makes a really weird purple hot dog casserole… don’t ask. Between my kitchen loving parents, the clinking cake pans, and the flying flour, it became clear that baking is in my blood.

I live in Los Angeles, by the beach. That’s where I do a majority of my living, working, eating, cocktailing and related horsing around.”

Check out Joy the Baker. Add it to your favorite feed reader. I think you will find some very interesting stuff there.

What are some of your favorite Subscriptions? Share them here in the comments!

Previously highlighted on Subscribed:

Subscribed is a Careers in New Media series  highlighting the Podcasts, YouTube Channels and Blogs that I follow on a daily basis. Check out this entry, and past entries, for some great New Media Content — Douglas

Filed under: Blogging, New Media, Subscribed

New Media Vocabulary: Widget/Web Widget

New media vocab logo

New Media Vocabulary: Widget

“In computing, a web widget is a software widget for the web. It’s a small application with limited functionality that can be installed and executed within a web page by an end user. A widget has the role of a transient or auxiliary application, meaning that it just occupies a portion of a webpage and does something useful with information fetched from other websites and displayed in place. Other terms used to describe web widgets include:[citation needed] portlet, web part, gadget, badge, module, webjit, capsule, snippet, mini and flake. Widgets are typically created in DHTML, JavaScript, or Adobe Flash.

Widgets often take the form of on-screen device (clocks, event countdowns, auction-tickers, stock market tickers, flight arrival information, daily weather etc.).” — Wikipedia.org

Widgets are an important part of any web site these days. Myself alone I use widgets of some sort on nearly any page of my blogs or web site. I use them to link to Amazon books, cookbooks from Cookbook Cafe, show off my Twitter follower, Facebook or Google+ follower numbers and much more. Widgets allow anyone, regardless of their prowess with HTML, include high-end (and very useful features) on their web sites without having to write their own programs.

YouTube videos which are embedded in blogs and web sites are another great use for a “widget.” Bloggers need only copy the provided code from YouTube and then paste that code into their pages or blog post.  These “embeds” allow the easy spreading of content while still rewarding the original content creator.

For more information on Widget/Web Widget:

Previously on New Media Vocabulary:

Filed under: Blogging, New Media, New Media Vocabulary, Technology

New Media Tip: Linking and Embedding specific sections of a YouTube video

When sharing YouTube videos, we often just link to the entire video and let people decide what they want to watch. While this is fine for short videos, sometimes we would rather refer people to just a specific portion of a much longer video. Perhaps we are highlighting a quote, tip or idea.

YouTube provides some basic tools for specifying a start time when linking or embedding a video, but with the addition of a few parameters to the video URL, you can direct viewers to a very specific segment.

For example, if you are linking or embedding a video, you will see these options on the YouTube page:

Youtube link 1

If you check the checkbox, you can either enter in a time, or the time will be taken from the point where you are currently viewing in the video.

This results in a URL in the form of: http://youtu.be/E-GekEZOwLQ?t=11m54s . The video will start playing at this point and continue unit the end.

If you want want to specify both a start and end time, then you will need to add a few different parameters to the YouTube URL.

http://www.youtube.com/v/%5Bvideo_id%5D&start=%5Bstart_at_second%5D&end=%5Bend_at_second%5D&version=3)

In this example, you would need to replace the bracketed sections above with the appropriate settings.

http://www.youtube.com/v/E-GekEZOwLQ&start=714&end=760&version=3

This could link people to the appropriate video, launch it full screen and start playing at the appropriate spot when they click Play.

To embed a video in your blog or web page which does the same thing, you can include the start and end parameters in the standard YouTube iframe embed code.

First, copy the standard embed code from the YouTube video page:

Youtube embed 1

Then add the start and end parameters, so that the code looks like this:

..and here is the resulting YouTube video…

While making these embeds of specific video section does require adding a little information to the standard embed, it should be straightforward enough for anyone to accomplish.

Do you have further questions about YouTube linking and embedding? Add your questions and comments below and I will add additional information.

Filed under: Blogging, New Media, New Media Tips, Software, Technology, Tips, Video, YouTube

Subscribed 029: CookAppeal – Food-Wine-Fun

Subscribed is my series highlighting the Podcasts, YouTube Channels and Blogs that I follow on a daily basis. Check out this entry, and past entries, for some great New Media Content — Douglas

Cookappeal

CookAppeal

This is another one of the many food blogs I follow. I regularly re-pin and repost interesting items from all these blogs. They also help me keep in touch with what is happening in food all over the US and even other parts of the world.

Recent recipes and articles from CookAppeal include Apple-General Tso Glaze Stuffed Cornish Hen, Cherry-Lemon Pecan Cake and 5 Spices Beneficial to Your Health.

From the CookAppeal web site…

“I experiment with Flavors”… Elizabeth Stelling, hails from her home state of Texas and has been involved in the food industry via institutional, fast food, B&B’s, ethnic eateries and other restaurants since she was fourteen. Now living n New Jersey she has ran her own cafe, teaches culinary classes, runs a small boutique catering and staffing business, restaurant consulting for NJWBO, is a personal chef and shares her love of cooking with local, organic, healthy, and natural ingredients with the community. Chef E is a member of Slow Food and the American Wine Society, Princeton, New Jersey. She has published written works of poetry and media pieces, as well as ran Open Mics in the Princeton, NJ area.”

Link: CookAppeal

What are some of your favorite Subscriptions? Share them here in the comments!

Previously highlighted on Subscribed:

Filed under: Blogging, Elsewhere, New Media, Subscribed

Archive: Douglas talks Careers and New Media with Bigg Success – March 10, 2010

Originally appeared on BiggSuccess.com

Bigg Success Podcast LogoCareer Success with New Media

We were happy to visit with Douglas E. Welch today on The Bigg Success Show today. Douglas is an expert on building the career you deserve and spreading the word about your talents using social media. Among other things, he’s the host of two great blogs and podcasts: Career Opportunities and Careers in New Media. Here’s a recap of the conversation:

Read Douglas talks with George & Mary-Lyn on The Bigg Success Show! with complete text transcript.

Listen to Douglas talk with George & Mary-Lyn on The Bigg Success Show!

Filed under: Audio, Blogging, New Media, podcast, podcasting, Show

Subscribed 028: City Farmer News

Subscribed is my series highlighting the Podcasts, YouTube Channels and Blogs that I follow on a daily basis. Check out this entry, and past entries, for some great New Media Content — Douglas

City Farmer News

City farmer news

I like to keep a eye on what is happening in the world of urban agriculture and City Farmer News helps greatly in that area. They post a wide variety of urban agriculture stories including, recently, Portland State University survey of Urban Agriculture, Bitponics: Where Urban Agriculture Meets The Internet Of Things and Urban agriculture and food: between public policies and local initiatives.

From the City Farmer News web site…

Shoemakers, fashion models, computer geeks, politicians, lawyers, teachers, chefs … all city dwellers … all can grow food at home after work in back yards, community gardens or on flat roofs. For the past 35 years, City Farmer has encouraged urban dwellers to pull up a patch of lawn and plant some vegetables, kitchen herbs and fruit. Our message is the same today as it was in 1978 and will be relevant far into the future.

This website is a collection of stories about our work at City Farmer here in Vancouver, Canada, and about urban farmers from around the world. The site is maintained by City Farmer executive director, Michael Levenston.

Link: City Farmer News

What are some of your favorite Subscriptions? Share them here in the comments!

Previously highlighted on Subscribed:

Filed under: Blogging, New Media, Subscribed

New Media Prescription: Don’t “Complain to the Choir” when producing New Media

We need to talk…

One of the great strengths of New Media — be it blogging, videos, photos, social media — is the ability to connect directly to your audience. You don’t have any middlemen distorting your message or otherwise getting in the way. Unfortunately, this also means you don’t have someone watching over your shoulder to gently nudge you and say, “Perhaps you might want to re-think that.”

One common trap I see for New Media producers is, what I all, “Complaining to the Choir.” Like the age old adage against “preaching to the choir”, it is to be avoided for a number of reasons. First of all, though, what does it mean when you are “Complaining to the Choir?” It means to complain to those people who are actually the opposite of those you want to address.

When things aren’t going well for a new media producers — videos are getting liked, viewed or shared — blog posts are being ignored — revenue isn’t coming in — producers can spend entire posts, videos or podcasts complaining about the issue. They’ll cajole, they’ll berate, they will express their sadness and their fear that they might have to go back to their old way of work. As a fellow producer, I can empathize with them. Being a producer means facing criticism, nasty feedback, Internet trolls and other burdens on a daily basis. That said, I also understand that bringing this negativity into a show or blog can have exactly the opposite effect they wish to have. Focusing on the negative can actually reduce views, downloads and readers ben further , if you do it too often.

As a producer, your best approach is to ignore the negativity and simply move on to your next production. Focusing on the negative will only depress you further.

Here is why “Complaining to the Choir” is such a bad idea:

  • You annoy your biggest supporters

It is a simple fact that those a producer would most like to reach with their message probably aren’t watching, listening or reading anyway. Instead you are complaining to your biggest supporters — and perhaps driving them away, too. Your supporters come to your blog, your video, your podcasts because they love the content you produce. If you produce a show full of complaints and low on content, you are actively disrespecting their support. It is like a preacher complaining to the choir that no one comes to church anymore, even those these people do come to church AND also participate in other ways.

  • You produce yet another show with low viewership, low likes and low shares

When you produce a complaining show, you are expanding the effect you are complaining about and driving your ratings even lower. It is fair to say that a show filled with complaints, directed at the wrong people, is sure to garner less views and popularity than one of your traditional, content rich show. I had that very experience today. I watched the complaining show, but I could not bring myself to click the Like button, as I couldn’t honestly recommend it my followers as a show they should watch. They wouldn’t find it enjoyable and I would feel that I had offered a bad recommendation.

  • Complaints don’t drive success, great content does

While I can understand producers feeling worried and upset over various issues, it is always important to remember that content, not complaints drives your success. Viewers don’t really care if you are struggling. They come for the great content and many will support you by clicking Like or subscribing. If you want to truly have an effect on your issues, produce more great content. It is the only thing that matters. It is the only thing that will attract the support you need and desire.

  • Share your personal life, but perhaps not your producer life

Producing new media can be a lonely world, but beware of sharing your feelings about your show with your audience. They probably don’t care. Sure, you can share your thoughts about other personal issues, life changes, struggles, etc, but when you bring your producer complains to the conversation a subtle line is crossed. People lose sight of you as a person and start to think of you as just another faceless media drone. Viewers love to know more about your personal life, but they don’t really care about the nitty-gritty of being a producer. Most viewers don’t want to know “how the sausage is made” as long as it results in great content.

The next time you are feeling worried or depressed about your New Media productions and their success, seek out a close personal friend or a New Media user group to air your complaints and worries. Don’t take them to your audience. Your complains do nothing to benefit the audience and can only harm your standing with them.

Now, get back to work and produce something GREAT!

Filed under: Blogging, New Media, New Media Prescription, Opinion, YouTube

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