New Media Interchange

Audio: New Media Interchange 5: UpFronts NewFronts & YouTube Celebs with Douglas E. Welch

New Media interchange, my new show with 3rd Pass Media, is now available on iTunes.

Please subscribe, review and rate via iTunes 


New Media Interchange is a podcast spotlighting various developments in New Media & focusing on the media world beyond mainstream television and radio, including podcasting, YouTube, live streaming, gaming and more. Hosted by Douglas E. Welch , pioneer podcaster, blogger and new media consultant.


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Listen to New Media Interchange 5: UpFronts NewFronts & YouTube Celebs with Douglas E. Welch


New Media Interchange is part of the 3rd Pass Media Network which is launching a series of shows this week including Mindul(l) Media, The Render Break Report, New Media Interchange and More. You’ll find more information about 3rd Pass Media at http://3rdPass.Media.

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New Media Interchange 5: UpFronts NewFronts & YouTube Celebs with Douglas E. Welch

This is New Media Interchange where we talk about the media world beyond mainstream television and radio, including podcasting, YouTube, live streaming, gaming and more. I’m your host, Douglas E. Welch, pioneer podcaster, blogger and writer.

In today’ show…

  • Networks vs. New Media at the Television UpFronts”
  • YouTube Stars vs Mainstream Celebrities
  • Some Amazing YouTube Stats from Syracuse University
  • News Followups about Virtual Reality, Ubisoft and 4k video delivery
  • Final Part of my interview with Michael Anderson, CEO of GameWisp.com which is helping game play video makers expand their monetization optons
  • Next entry in my Subscribed series where I share the great podcasts, YouTube Channels and blogs I’m subscribed to.
  • See the complete show notes at 3rdPass.media

More after this…

Today’s show is brought to you by Audible.com. I love New Media like podcasting and YouTube, but I also love all types of books. If you love audio books you can support New Media Interchange and 3rdPass Media by starting your free 30-day trial with Audible today. Choose from over 100,000 books, including the great business and productivity book, Getting Things Done by David AllenVisit AudibleTrial.com/3rdpass or use the link in the show notes today.

See the complete show note at 3rdPass.media


Networks vs. New Media at the Television UpFronts”YouTube Stars vs Mainstream CelebritiesSome Amazing YouTube Stats from Syracuse UniversityNews Followups about Virtual Reality, Ubisoft and 4k video deliveryFinal Part of my interview with Michael Anderson, CEO of GameWisp.com which is helping game play video makers expand their monetization optonsNext entry in my Subscribed series where I share the great podcasts, YouTube Channels and blogs I’m subscribed to.

 
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Filed under: Audio, New Media, News, Opinion, podcast, podcasting, Show, Technology

Audio: New Media Interchange 4: Is Your Production Ready For 4K? & The Launch of Virtual Reality with Douglas E. Welch

New Media interchange, my new show with 3rd Pass Media, is now available on iTunes.

Please subscribe, review and rate via iTunes 


New Media Interchange is a podcast spotlighting various developments in New Media & focusing on the media world beyond mainstream television and radio, including podcasting, YouTube, live streaming, gaming and more. Hosted by Douglas E. Welch , pioneer podcaster, blogger and new media consultant.


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Listen to New Media Interchange 4: Is Your Production Ready For 4K? & The Launch of Virtual Reality with Douglas E. Welch


New Media Interchange is part of the 3rd Pass Media Network which is launching a series of shows this week including Mindul(l) Media, The Render Break Report, New Media Interchange and More. You’ll find more information about 3rd Pass Media at http://3rdPass.Media.

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Your Production Ready For 4K? & The Launch of Virtual Reality with Douglas E. Welch

This is New Media Interchange where we talk about the media world beyond mainstream television and radio, including podcasting, YouTube, live streaming, gaming and more. I’m your host, Douglas E. Welch, pioneer podcaster, blogger and writer.

In today’ show…

  • Is it time to move to 4k video for your New Media project?
  • Oculus Rift plans on selling to general public in 2016
  • Comcast has more internet than cable television subscribers
  • Part 2 of my interview with Michael Anderson of GameWisp.com which is helping game play video makers expand their monetization options
  • Next entry in my Subscribed series where I share the great podcasts, YouTube Channels and blogs I’m subscribed to.
  • See the complete show notes at 3rdPass.media

More after this…

Today’s show is brought to you by Audible.com. I love New Media like podcasting and YouTube, but I also love all types of books. If you love audio books you can support New Media Interchange and 3rdPass Media by starting your free 30-day trial with Audible today. Choose from over 100,000 books.Michelangelo and the Pope’s Ceiling by Ross King – a great non-fiction history book that explores the world of Michelangelo as he toils on the Sistine Chapel. Visit AudibleTrial.com/3rdpass or use the link in the show notes today.

See the complete show note at 3rdPass.media


Filed under: Audio, New Media, News, Opinion, Show, Technology

Audio: New Media Interchange 3: Podcasting Trolls Turned Back and Why .sucks…sucks with Douglas E. Welch

New Media interchange, my new show with 3rd Pass Media, is now available on iTunes.

Subscribe Via iTunes 


New Media Interchange is a podcast spotlighting various developments in New Media & focusing on the media world beyond mainstream television and radio, including podcasting, YouTube, live streaming, gaming and more. Hosted by Douglas E. Welch , pioneer podcaster, blogger and new media consultant.


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Listen to New Media Interchange 3: Podcasting Trolls Turned Back and Why .sucks…sucks


New Media Interchange is part of the 3rd Pass Media Network which is launching a series of shows this week including Mindul(l) Media, The Render Break Report, New Media Interchange and More. You’ll find more information about 3rd Pass Media at http://3rdPass.Media.

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Podcasting Trolls Turned Back and Why .sucks…sucks

This is New Media Interchange where we talk about the media world beyond mainstream television and radio, including podcasting, YouTube, live streaming, gaming and more. I’m your host, Douglas E. Welch, pioneer podcaster, blogger and writer.

In today’ show…

  • Podcasting Patent Trolls Turned Back
  • .Sucks domains also suck for new media creators
  • Part 1 of my interview with Michael Anderson of GameWisp.com which is helping game play video makers expand their monetization optons
  • I’ll round out the show with the next installment of my Subscribed series.

More after this…

Today’s show is brought to you by Audible.com. I love New Media like podcasting and YouTube, but I also love all types of books. If you love audio books you can support New Media Interchange and 3rdPass Media by starting your free 30-day trial with Audible today. Choose from over 100,000 books. Including one of my favorites, The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern – an amazing magical fantasy novel.  Visit AudibleTrial.com/3rdpass or use the link in the show notes today.


Podcasting Patents Invalidated

In a move that is sure to warm the hearts of many a New Media producer, The US Patent and Trademark Office invalidated a number of claims on podcasting patents that were held by the company Personal Audio. Personal Audio made a splash in the podcasting world a few years ago by claiming that they owned a patent on the various podcasting technologies and everyone — especially the big boys of podcasting including Adam Carolla, Leo Laporte and even CBS — either paid them licensing fees or face being sued. CBS even settled a lawsuit that was filed by Personal Audio in Texas rather than fight the claim. They might be wondering what they paid for now, though, as the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) effectively countered Personal Audio’s patent claims, leading the USPTO to invalidate key portions of the company’s patents. This doesn’t necessarily mean that Personal Audio, or others, won’t try to claim these patents in the future, but it certainly limits their options.

The USPTO ruled that the patent granted did not take into consideration the fact that the technologies and methods of podcasting were quite obvious at the time of filing and therefore not new, unique or patentable.This is a very common problem with patents in the US as it struggles to deal with technologies never even imagined when it was first set up. The New Media world will be continue to be threatened by “patent trolls” such as this due to the nature of the US patent system, and its inherent flaws, If people can find a way to exploit the system to their advantage, they will, until some of those flaws are corrected.

In an EFF Press Release, Staff Attorney Vera Ranieri said, “We have a lot to celebrate here. But unfortunately, our work to protect podcasting is not done. Personal Audio continues to seek patents related to podcasting. We will continue to fight for podcasters, and we hope the Patent Office does not give them any more weapons to shake down small podcasters.”

For my own part, in 10 years of podcasting I have seen many people attempt to make money on the back of content creators. Individuals and companies have tried to insert themselves as content gatekeepers, subvert podcasting content and RSS feeds to their own ends through portals and basically acting as “digital carpetbaggers” — attempting to extract income in every way but creating content themselves. Every new industry faces this particular type of intruder as it grows, so all New Media creators must be constantly vigilant of how they might be abused and how to stand up for themselves when issues occur.

You’ll find links to additional information, as always, in the show notes.

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Why .sucks — sucks

.com. .org. .edu .mil. These are all familiar endings to Internet domains we type into our browsers every day. They are called Top Level Domains or TLDs by ICANN or Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers. These are the folks that control a large part of the Internet, including domain name systems. For years, we lived with relatively few TLDs like those mentioned earlier, but lately there has been an explosion of new TLDs being offered including .tv, .guru, .tips, .events and even — as our own network 3rd Pass Media uses — .media. There are a host of reasons for adding new TLDs, even if the average Internet user still reflexively types .com when entering a web address. Companies and individuals want to reinforce their brand. I understand that. They are looking for web URLs that somehow better reflect the nature of their business. I have a variety of issues with one new TLD, though, .sucks.

Yes, you can now purchase a domain name like xyz123.sucks to host your blog and other content. As you might be able to see though, .sucks is different. Unlike other Top Level Domains, .sucks is almost universally derogatory and I believe, like a recent article on The Next Web declares, “This new domain is the future of trolling.” There are very few scenarios I see for someone purchasing a .sucks domain and none of them are pretty.

First, there will be the trolls mentioned in the article, buying well-known names in order to harass companies or individuals and generally make a pain of themselves. Trolls, spammers and other nefarious Internet users already cause a host of trouble. Do we really need to give them another weapon in their arsenal. While I can’t imagine DouglasEWelch.sucks being that popular, you can imagine sites like apple.sucks. windows.sucks and more have already been snapped up. This is inevitable with such a derogatory TLD. We are basically giving people the right to troll others in ways unheard of before. Sure people could have registered applesucks.com or some such name, but being able to use the new TLD certainly makes it easier to brand the site and for people to find it.

I am not sure what ICANN or Vox Populi — the company hosting and selling the new TLD — were thinking when they set up .sucks, but it sure feels like nothing more than a money grab.

It strikes me much like the old unlisted phone number scam used by telcom companies before the Internet. They’d sell your phone number to telemarketers so you could get sales calls every night of the week and then, when you looked for some relief from this, charge you for the privilege of making your phone number unlisted. Talk about double-dipping.

Not only will Vox Populi make money selling the TLD to discontented Internet trolls, they can also sell the .sucks domains to large companies and individuals in a peremptory effort to keep it out of the hands of these trolls. For me, this smacks of exploitation, if not outright extortion. “Buy your .sucks domain now or who knows who might snap it up and use it against you.” This same tactic has been used to sell nearly every previous TLD additions like .net and .info, but we have never had to face such a singularly derogatory TLD like .sucks. before. Those who might have been inclined to ignore previous calls to buy every permutation of their domains might be more inclined to buy when it comes to .sucks.

Some, but not all, it seems. In an interview with NPR, Adobe’s associate general counsel J. Scott Evans said, “I basically think it’s extortion. We are not going to participate in any kind of extortion scheme. I’ve told my people the best way not to get included is not to suck.” I feel much the same way and I’m glad to see someone standing up against the process.

Vox Populi stands to make a lot of money on .sucks, especially when allowing trademark-holding companies to purchase any pertinent domains during the so-called “sunrise period” before the new domains are sold to the public. Vox Populi is charging trademark holders almost $2500 per domain during this period, although the public will be able to register .sucks domains for around $25 when they are made available to everyone. Large companies like Apple, Microsoft and Google have reportedly purchased large numbers of .sucks domains in an effort to protect their trademark and brand.

For me, this points up a large problem with TLDs in general. While all new TLDs are promoted as providing some special cache, some special need, some special benefit, the end goal seems to be to simply make money, as quickly as possible. Derogatory domains like .sucks only ramp up the process and send companies and individuals into a frenzy of buying in what I consider a misguided attempt at self-protection. Are we going to see an escalation of these tactics into even more threatening TLDs like .die, .kill, .hate and more. I know it sounds a bit ludicrous, but after seeing .sucks approved as an official TLD, I’m not so sure.

Buying a domain so that it can never be used shouldn’t be a business and Internet content creators shouldn’t feel that it is required of them. This seems the very definition of extortion to me. “Buy .sucks now or we’ll sell it to some troll who will make you look bad.” Not cool. Not cool at all.

What’s your opinion on .sucks and other domain TLDs? Sound off in the comments or via Twitter at @NMIPodcast.

Read more at:

A New Internet Domain: Extortion Or Free Speech?


YouTube starts move towards providing ad free subscriptions

A few months ago, YouTube floated the idea of providing a subscription service that would make all videos on the site free of ads. As a YouTube content creator myself, my first question was “Ok, if you remove ads, then how I am going to get paid.” YouTube monetization via Google Adsense is a main income stream for many well-known YouTubers, so I am sure that my question was echoed by many content creators around the world.

Lacking any additional information from Google at that time, I imagined the system would be similar to Amazon’s KDP Select Program for Prime Members, where I am paid from a collective fund whenever a Prime member downloads my books for free. Now that YouTube has updated their terms and conditions, it seems I was close. Subscribers who pay a monthly fee will see my videos without ads, but I will then receive a portion (which looks to be 55%) of the subscription proceeds based on my “share” of the audience — how many views, how many minute watched, etc compared to other channels.

Now that this missing piece has been filled in, we will probably see further movement towards this ad-free environment. As music services such as Pandora and Spotify have shown, people are willing to pay to avoid advertising if they can. As a long time podcaster, I’ve never really been convinced that traditional advertising was really the best way to earn a profit from my content. This move by YouTube could be part of an on-going trend to break out of advertising models and follow along the path of other subscription services available for Pandora, Spotify and Twitch TV and patronage systems like Patreon.

There is one major issue yet to be resolved, though. YouTube seems to be choosing to be a bit of a bully when it comes to enrolling people in this new program. If YouTube Creators want to monetize any of their videos in the usual way, they will also have to enroll them in the new subscription service or risk having those video set to “private” mode. This would still allow them to host the videos on YouTube, but make them virtually undiscoverable on YouTube itself.

While I can understand that YouTube wants to insure a large amount of ad-free content is available for subscribers at the start and simplify their placement of advertising on videos, it seems a bit extreme to force everyone to make all their videos available to subscribers ad-free. For small channels like myself, I probably would have registered with the new service anyway, but being pressured into doing so still doesn’t feel very good. Larger YouTube Channels might find that they can make more money outside of the subscription system and won’t like being forced into this program either. This could result in the exact opposite of the desired effect — reducing the number and quality of the videos available to subscribers. We won’t truly know how it affects YouTube Creators, though, until YouTube and Google provide more info.

Ad-Free subscriptions are just one way in which New Media can provide a service traditional television or radio cannot and yet another way for services like YouTube to build their — and hopefully content creators — profits. I know that I will eagerly watching for more information on this ad-free subscription service and how it will work for both the viewers and content creators.

Read more at:


 SFX: MediaTwits Opening Audio

Followups

In a followup to the media fragmentation story in the last episode, MediaShift from PBS has an online series on Cord Cutting — viewers who are abandoning cable television subscriptions in favor of over-the-top services like Netflix, HBO Now and Amazon Prime.

In their article, MediaShift writes, “Cutting the cord to cable has gone from a fringe action to a way of life for millions of Americans that have given up on expensive cable and satellite TV packages and built their own on-demand TV experience with streaming TV.”

I am a cord cutter myself, turning off my cable television subscription in favor of over-the-air broadcasts for those few mainstream shows I watch and a combination of Netflix, YouTube, and Amazon Instant Video for movie rentals. We cut the cord when our cable television cost, along with Internet service rose above $100 per month. After a quick review, we realised how little television we were watching and how we would only ever watch a fraction of the channels provided. My son was aging out of the world of Nickelodeon and Cartoon Network and was focusing more and more on his YouTube subscriptions, so that made the decision even easier.

Some people warn that you can end up paying more for online subscriptions than you were paying for cable television. That said, even if you are paying a similar amount, I believe that the quality and quantity of content you receive is far more in-line with your entertainment wants and needs. You might be paying the same or more, but you are getting far more bang for your buck.

A recent edition of MediaShift’s companion discussion show, MediaTwits discusses cord cutting and the move of both HBO and CBS’ into the over-the-top streaming market. You can watch the entire episode of MediaTwits using the link in the show notes and their online article includes a large number of links for further reading on cord cutting in our New Media world. You’ll find a link in the show notes.

Cutting the Cord 2015: A Special Series on Streaming TV


 SFX: Theme for Harold (var. 3) by Kevin MacLeod (http://incompetch.com) under Creative Commons License

Interview with Michael Anderson of GameWisp – Part 1

SFX: Interview audio


SFX: Science @ NASA Opening audio

Subscribed

Science @ NASA

A geek in one thing, a geek in all things. This is how I often describe myself. I can geek out on nearly anything — gardening, robotics, beekeeping, architecture, whatever. Since my earliest days as a student, I have also always geeked out over science in all its forms. This love of science means that I am always tuned in to what is happening at NASA and other scientific organizations. I even have a friend who works at JPL who helps to keep me informed and has provided me several opportunities to visit and hang out with the scientists there. Despite what many of us older folks may have believed in high school — science is cool!

One great way of keeping in touch with the many scientific projects and discoveries at NASA is by subscribing to their YouTube channel, Science @ NASA. Amazing and informative new content arrives nearly every week and recent episodes have included “How Desert Dust Feeds Amazon Forests”, “The Mystery of Nanoflares”, and “The Strange Way Fluids Slosh on the International Space Station.” Science @ NASA is a great way of feeding my geek needs and it is always a pleasure to see it pop-up in my YouTube subscription list of new videos.

On the Science @ NASA YouTube page, you’ll also found even more links to great NASA channels produced by installations like NASA Ames Research Center, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory and NASA Kennedy Space Center.

You’ll find Science @ NASA’s YouTube channel at ScienceAtNASA or you can use the link in the show notes.

Science @ NASA on YouTube


SFX: Music Bed

That’s it for this episode of New Media Interchange where I talk about the media world beyond mainstream television and radio, including podcasting, YouTube, live streaming, gaming and more.

Want to get each new episode of the show automatically? Be sure to subscribe via iTunes, the Podcasts app or Stitcher on your iOS devices or any other of your favorite podcasting clients. You can use the direct links in the show notes or search for New Media Interchange and look for the red, white and black New Media Interchange Logo

Some music written and produced by Kevin MacLeod at Incompetech.com and used under Creative Commons License by the author.

New Media Interchange is part of the 3rd Pass Media network. For more information, visit 3rdPass.media. Do you have questions or comments? Send them along to NMI@3rdpass.media or via Twitter at @NMIPodcast .

I’m Douglas E. Welch and I’ll be back next week with more New Media news on New Media Interchange..

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Filed under: Audio, New Media, News, Opinion, Show, Technology

Audio: New Media Interchange: HBO, Silicon Valley and TwitchTV, Media fragmentation, Meerkat and Periscope and more!

New Media interchange, my new show with 3rd Pass Media, is now available on iTunes.

Subscribe Via iTunes 


New Media Interchange is a podcast spotlighting various developments in New Media & focusing on the media world beyond mainstream television and radio, including podcasting, YouTube, live streaming, gaming and more. Hosted by Douglas E. Welch , pioneer podcaster, blogger and new media consultant.


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[audio http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/10478/997932/nmi_002.mp3]

Listen to HBO, Silicon Valley and TwitchTV, Media fragmentation, Meerkat and Periscope and more!


New Media Interchange is part of the 3rd Pass Media Network which is launching a series of shows this week including Mindul(l) Media, The Render Break Report, New Media Interchange and More. You’ll find more information about 3rd Pass Media at http://3rdPass.Media.

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HBO, Silicon Valley and TwitchTV, Media fragmentation, Meerkat and Periscope and more!

This is New Media Interchange where we talk about the media world beyond mainstream television and radio, including podcasting, YouTube, live streaming, gaming and more. I’m your host, Douglas E. Welch, pioneer podcaster, blogger and writer.

In today’ show…

  • HBO’s Silicon Valley takes their show directly to the gamer audience via TwitchTV,
  • Video Killed The Television Star: Why Total Fragmentation Is The New Norm
  • Meerkat and Periscope put live streaming in your hand

I’ll round out the show with a book review of video game storytelling and the next installment of my Subscribed series.

More after this…

Today’s show is brought to you by Audible.com. I love New Media like podcasting and YouTube, but I also love all types of books. If you love audio books you can support New Media Interchange and 3rdPass Media by starting your free 30-day trial with Audible today. Choose from over 100,000 books. Including one of my favorites, The Hobbit. Visit AudibleTrial.com/3rdpass or use the link in the show notes today.

SFX: Silicon Valley Trailer Clip

HBO’s Silicon Valley takes their show directly to the growing gamer audience via TwitchTV

A recent article in The Verge details how HBO is taking their newest comedy, Silicon Valley, directly to an existing audience that is probably predisposed to watch it — the viewers of Amazon’s TwitchTV streaming service that focuses on all types of gaming related content. These TwitchTV viewers likely already understand the joys of “cable-cutting” or freeing themselves from cable television subscriptions in lieu of “over-the-top services” like Twitch, YouTube, Netflix and now, HBO Now..

For me, this move makes a great deal of sense. Through Twitch, HBO can reach an audience that almost directly matches their desired audience. Through HBO, Twitch expands its programming beyond game play and into other aspects of their members’ lives. HBO also gets a chance to give Twitch users a taste of what they might be able to watch if they subscribe to HBO Now — content that was unavailable except via cable television until very recently. As The Verge article states, HBO is using “video games as a trojan horse” and getting their content in front of “roughly 100 million monthly active users” of Twitch. It is my bet that it will prove to be great promotion for everyone involved — HBO, Twitch and the users of both sites.

I imagine we’ll see more and more collaborations like this between all the players in what I call the “alternative TV” market. As the choice of content and services increases, discovery of exciting new content grows more difficult. Users can be overwhelmed with choice, but “giving them a taste” of content has always been a way to gather new viewers and it will continue to be important long into the future. Video content producers still need to find receptive audiences, as HBO has done here, but the opportunities for these collaborations in new and unique ways will continue to grow.

Video Killed The Television Star: Why Total Fragmentation Is The New Norm

All this collaboration, cross-over and cooperation between various content providers continues to push the fragmentation of the television and online video content market and David Armano over at the Logic+Emotion blog has written posts detailing exactly how this is happening and the trends he sees being created. First came DVRs, then YouTube, then other online video services signalled the end of television’s stranglehold on video entertainment. It gave consumers more choice over the type of content they wanted to view and provided the technology to time shift entertainment so viewers could watch what they wanted, when they wanted it. They didn’t need to rely on the curation and control that was wielded by mainstream media anymore.

Once the technology advanced to a certain degree — with relatively easy-to-access high speed Internet and software — content creators and providers immediately saw the opportunities it presented. Once content was available in significant quality and quantity, users quickly began to explore and enjoy the viewing options they had and — despite claims to the contrary — began cutting the cord more and more frequently.

For myself, I haven’t had a cable television subscription for several years now, opting to use broadcast to watch the few mainstream shows I do watch and a combination of YouTube, Netflix and other online video sources for the remainder of my viewing. Even though I am older than the target demographic for cord cutting, I have no problems leaving the “vast wasteland” of mainstream television behind, now that I have plentiful options. I can imagine that younger viewers, who tend be be a bit more tech savvy find it even easier to explore the myriad of options available. For me, the fragmentation of the industry is a welcome change and one I think will provide more unique and diverse content than ever before. There is a whole new entertainment world out there and I plan on taking great advantage of it.

While YouTube, Netflix and the other current “big boys” of online video content will continue to thrive in the coming years, even they are seeing competition and fragmentation in the form of live streaming sites like TwitchTV, and smartphone apps that put streaming in the hands of anyone with a smartphone.

SFX: Music Bed

…and that thought leads us into our last story for this episode…

Meerkat and Periscope put live streaming in your hand

In the last couple of weeks there has been an explosion in the mobile live streaming space with first the indie app, Meerkat, exploding to life during this year’s South by Southwest (SXSW) conference followed closely by recent Twitter acquisition, Periscope. Both of these apps all offer nearly one-touch live streaming from your smartphone or tablet and use Twitter as the main discovery and interaction source, with streams being announced immediately via Twitter and interactive chat messages, in the form of Tweets, overlaid right on the video stream. The release of these two services caused a veritable flood of live streams with everyone testing out the services and how they might be able to use them. Things have settled down considerably since launch, but I am still seeing quite a bit of activity in my Twitter stream.

For me, live streaming is a special use case. While I wouldn’t use it everyday, it can be dramatically useful during special events or breaking news stories to give immediate and alternative views a forum for the event. Other content creators thrive on live streaming. Both they and their audience love the immediate interaction via Twitter or chat room. it does indeed bring a much different feel to a show which is quite different from pre-recorded videos such as those on YouTube and elsewhere.

It will be a while before we see exactly where Meerkat, Periscope and other live streaming options fit into the overall online video market, but I think we can all be certain that we will see other, similar apps in the near future.

You can read more about Meerkat and Periscope in the articles linked in the show notes.

Is Meerkat winner-take-all?

Periscope, Twitter’s answer to Meerkat-style live streaming, is now available

The Race To Make Everyone A Livestreamer

Angry Joe and Nintendo

In a follow up on our story from last episode about Nintendo claiming copyright and advertising revenue from YouTubers who share their game play, it looks like the company finally forced one major YouTube personality, Joe ‘Angry Joe’ Vargas to give up on them entirely. Vargas boasts nearly 2 million subscribers on YouTube, a significant audience in the gaming space.

In a multi-part, self-titled “Rant” Vargas details how much money he has spent on Nintendo products and how much time he has spent sharing and promoting their devices and games and his extreme disappointment in the company’s YouTube policies. He has decided to totally drop the playing, recording and reviewing any of Nintendo’s devices and games rather than deal with constant copyright claims or joining Nintendo’s Creators Program which takes 40% of a YouTuber’s revenue for the right to post and share Nintendo games and doesn’t cover usage of all Nintendo games, only a portion.

You can find all of Angry Joe’s Nintendo rants, and all his other game reviews and game play videos on his YouTube Channel – AngryJoeShow.

YouTuber Angry Joe Swears Off Nintendo Videos After The Company Claimed His Mario Party 10 Take

Also in the news this week:

HBO Now Live on Apple TV

HBO’s over-the-top service HBO Now launched this week exclusively on Apple TV and Apple mobile devices for 3 months. Fans of Game of Thrones and other HBO shows can finally get them, legally, without a cable television subscription, for $15 a month.

Roku 3 Media Streaming Box adds new remote with with voice search

Along with Apple TV and Google Chromecast there are other streaming media players out there on the market, including the somewhat lesser known Roku 3. Press releases report the Roku has added a new remote to this device which allows you to do Voice Search to find shows over about 17 major apps, including Netflix, Amazon Instant Video, and Hulu Plus.

Pixar’s Renderman released for free

Now anyone with a powerful enough computer can use the same animation software used to create PIxar movies like Toy Story for their non-commercial projects. This follows on the release of various gaming engines like UnReal Engine 4 and Unity in free non-commercial use versions. And also better licensing options that allow independent game makers to use the software for free up to certain levels of earnings.

Links to all these stories are in the show notes

SFX: Music Bridge – “Theme for Harold (var. 3)” by Kevin MacLeod (http://Incompetch.com) under Creative Commons License

Book Review: Video Game Storytelling: What Every Developer Needs to Know about Narrative Techniques by Evan Skolnick

Check out the book on Amazon.com

At first glance, an outsider to the world of video games might see little relation between a major motion picture and a video game. They seem to be different genres, different worlds, even when movies crossover to become games and games crossover and are developed into movies — often badly. The action, the interactivity, the immersion of video games can make their stories seem unlike a standard narrative program. Surely, due to the player’s control of characters, video games can’t be written in the same way as a television script. While that might be true in some regards, when you go deeper into the creation of story that drives the final narrative, there are more similarities between writing for film and video games than you might imagine. These similarities also mean that many similar challenges exist for these writers regardless of their genre.

Writer Evan Skolnik is an international speaker and educator who conducts workshops on storytelling techniques and has worked on large scale video game projects such as Star Wars 1313, Marvel: Ultimate Alliance 2 and Spiderman 3.

The first half of Video Game Storytelling would be familiar to anyone who has ever taken a film writing course. It discusses the “three act structure”, “The Hero’s Journey” and the Monomyth that are the basis for many of our most classic books and films like Star Wars and Alien. Skolnick uses these well-known films to illustrate various writing concepts but then expands his examples with examples from well-known video games and how they also use these same techniques. These games include the Bioshock series, Uncharted and Metal Gear Solid. Thankfully, just as with movies, many scenes and playthroughs of these games are easily available via YouTube. This allows the reader to familiarize themselves with games they may have never played and fully understand the lessons Skolnick references.

While there is a good deal of video game examples spread throughout this first half, I found myself wishing for even more examples of how the traditional writing and storytelling rules applied to video games.

The second half of Video Game Storytelling details the many disciplines involved in creating a video game and how each of these affects — and is affected by — the narrative tools he has illustrated in the first half. For incipient video game developers this is where they will find the “meat” of the book and the majority of the author’s expertise. The information found in the first half might be found in any good book on screenwriting, but the detailed breakdown of all the video game development disciplines, their challenges and their relationship to the narrative of any video game should probably be required reading for anyone considering a career in video game design and development.

In the “In the Trenches” section, Skolnik details the responsibilities of each important discipline including Game Character Development, Level and Mission Development, Environments, Audio and several others. He also details how a video game writer needs to work with each of these disciplines in order to create a well-balanced, successful, and most importantly playable video game.

Throughout Video Game Storytelling you will see and hear a complaint common to any collaborative writing and creative enterprise — the lack of inclusion, if not outright respect, for the creator of the narrative of a game. There are several common mistakes in dealing with a writer, whether in traditional media such as television or film or the relativly younger video game industry. Skolnick lays out the biggest mistakes creative teams can make with their narrative experts i.e. writers. These mistakes can range from not hiring a writer at all for your game to hiring a writer but then not giving them the power and support to defend the narrative from the competing demands of all the disciplines mentioned above. Too often writers are given all the responsibility for the narrative, but very little power to defend that narrative. This can often translate into taking much of the blame for a less-than-successful game, even when many of the narrative decisions were taken out of their control.

Skolnik’s best advice when hiring a video game writer can be summed up as — hire as early as possible in the development process, integrate them fully and equally with all the other disciplines and teams, listen to their guidance about the narrative. A game developer is paying their writer for their experience, advice, and knowledge. They should then take it. Too often, though, that is not the case. The writer — and the narrative — get shunted aside by cool gaming mechanics, great explosions and intricate AI characters.

One of the main reasons I requested a review copy of the book from Blogging for Books is so I could better familiarize myself with game development and be able to discuss it more intelligently with my high school aged son, who is looking at a career somewhere in the game development industry. As I read the book, I found myself reading him some of the stories and ideas out loud and also encouraging him several times to read the book as soon as I had completed it. I think there is a great deal of knowledge to be gained from both sections of the book. The “Basic Training” section gives an excellent introduction into the world of the Three-Act Structure and the second half applies that knowledge in very concrete ways specific to video game development. It is a great starting point for learning about an industry — video gaming — that is rapidly becoming a huge entertainment industry on the level of traditional television or film.

SFX: Far Lands or Bust Opening Clip

Subscribed

Today in my Subscribed series is Far Lands or Bust. This series is where I highlight those Podcasts, blogs and YouTube Channels I subscribe to and watch regularly.

Years ago my son, Joseph, was just getting into online gaming and his introduction to that world was the now common gateway drug of Minecraft. In Minecraft and online in multi-user worlds he found a great collection of people. I was almost universally surprised and happy with the quality of folks he found there, which made me feel more comfortable with allowing him to play more video games as he grew up.

His interest also developed my own interest in Minecraft both as a player and viewer of Minecraft-related content. He shared his favorite YouTube personalities and their channels with me and they became — and remain — a significant part of my online video viewing. Far Lands or Bust and its creator, KurtJMac was one of my first subscriptions.

Far Lands or Bust is a series of Minecraft videos with a good cause. Like a virtual walkathon, Kurt is walking to the “Far Lands” of Minecraft and raising money for the Child’s Play charity. He has raised over $269,000 so far with his travels. The show is combination of various things. It’s a travelogue as he walks through his Minecraft world, a bit of a video blog, and as some people see it — an audio podcast with some pretty scenery. As he walk and has adventures in the Minecraft world, Kurt talks about gaming-related topics as well as his other interests including space exploration and astronomy.

Each season, Kurt hosts a marathon live stream as the culmination when he and the viewers reach their fundraising goal for Child’s Play. This brings in special guests, special live episodes of Far Lands or Bust, group gameplay in Minecraft and other games and, typically, a lot of fun and laughter.

Kurt also does a host of other video shows, some are Minecraft related but he also enjoys a variety of driving games and loves to check out quirky, artistic or just plain odd games from independent game publishers. You can find everything at FarlandsorBust.com or on his YouTube Channel KurtJMac. You’ll find links in the show notes.

Far Lands or Bust

KurtJMac on YouTube

SFX: Music Bed

That’s it for this episode of New Media Interchange where I talk about the media world beyond mainstream television and radio, including podcasting, YouTube, live streaming, gaming and more.

Some music written and produced by Kevin MacLeod at Incompetech.com and used under Creative Commons License by the author.

New Media Interchange is part of the 3rd Pass Media network. For more information, visit 3rdPass.media. Do you have questions or comments? Send them along to NMI@3rdpass.media or via Twitter at @NMIPodcast .

I’m Douglas E. Welch and I’ll be back next week with more New Media news on New Media Interchange..

***

Filed under: Audio, New Media, News, Opinion, Show, Technology

Audio: New Media Interchange: Nintendo and Youtubers, Netflix to spend $5B on programming, Best time to post your videos and more!

This is the first episode of my new podcast series, New Media Interchange. While I will probably be re-posting the podcast here, it will have it’s own feed via the 3rd Pass Media Network. I’ll announce that here, including subscription links, as soon as that site is live. I might be re-directing this domain to that site or maintaining this presence, but I’ll be sure to let you all know — Douglas


New Media Interchange is a podcast spotlighting various developments in New Media & focusing on the media world beyond mainstream television and radio, including podcasting, YouTube, live streaming, gaming and more. Hosted by Douglas E. Welch , pioneer podcaster, blogger and new media consultant.


 Nmi logo lg

Listen to Nintendo and Youtubers, Netflix to spend $5B on programming, Best time to post your videos  and more!


New Media Interchange is part of the 3rd Pass Media Network which is launching a series of shows this week including Mindul(l) Media, The Render Break Report, New Media Interchange and More. You’ll find more information about 3rd Pass Media at http://3rdPass.Media.

#rd Pass Media Logo


Nintendo and Youtubers, Netflix to spend $5B on programming, Best time to post your videos  and more!

This is New Media Interchange where we talk about the media world beyond mainstream television and radio, including podcasting, YouTube, live streaming, gaming and more. I’m Douglas E. Welch, pioneer podcaster, blogger and writer.

In today’ show…

Nintendo wants a piece of that YouTube Money and plans on taking it out of the pockets of Let’s Play video makers, Netflix plans on spending over $5 billion on programming in 2016, and Tubefilter explains the best times to post your YouTube videos for maximum impact.

Will round out the show with some words about “Attracting Attention to Yourself” and end up with the first entry in my Subscribed series, highlighting the podcasts, blogs and YouTube Channels I am subscribed to.

More after this…

Today’s show is brought to you by Audible.com. I love New Media like podcasting and YouTube, but I also love all types of books. If you love audio books you can support New Media Interchange and 3rdPass Media by starting your free 30-day trial with Audible today. Choose from over 100,000 books. Including one of my favorites, The Hobbit..

Visit AudibleTrial.com/3rdpass or use the link in the show notes today. 


Gaming is the #2 category on YouTube, behind music, and you can find a wide variety of gaming reviews, recaps and a growing number of Let’s Play video series, where a gamer walks you through their experience of game from beginning to end. Some of these Let’s Play series can go on for 30 or 40 episodes as the gamer hacks and slashes their way through the zombies of Dying Light, works to save the fictional country of Kyrat from a crazed dictator or performs speed runs of amazing dexterity in Zelda or Mario Brothers. While many game manufacturers have a good relationship with Let’s Play producers — even providing them explicit license to play the game on video — the aged “big boy” of the gaming world — Nintendo hasn’t been playing nice of late.

Back in mid-2013, Nintendo starting claiming all YouTube revenue from many videos that included Nintendo Copyrighted content, like Let’s Play footage. They eventually backed off this wholesale money grab and last month created a “licensing” program that allows YouTube producers to continue sharing YouTube videos of Nintendo games in exchange for 30%-40% of the revenue according to articles from Game Informer. com.

While this certainly is a better deal than taking 100% of the revenue, I always look suspiciously at large companies taking money away from some of their biggest fans — turning off many of these fans from ever playing or sharing a company’s products in the future. Is this a sign that Nintendo is struggling overall and looking for a quick way to gain a quick cash boost? The company has been struggling of late, but I think trying to level out their balance sheet on the backs of fans might not be the way to do it.

What do you think? Are YouTuber’s getting a free ride on Nintendo gaming content? Is Nintendo making a desperate money grab? What does this mean for the thousands of hours of Nintendo gaming already available on YouTube and its creators? I’d love to know what you think. Send along a comment on the blog or via Twitter to @NMIPodcast.

Read More
Nintendo Updates Their Bad YouTube Policies By Making Them Worse


In our next story, courtesy of Business Insider, Netflix will spend $5 billion on programming in 2016…

Netflix will spend $5 billion on programming in 2016, more than everyone but ESPN, says Janney

I often comment to people how I am amazed to took so long for large, Internet companies like Netflix, Google and Amazon to get into content creation for their services. Living here in Hollywood itself, I have seen the production companies — those entities that do the actual nitty-gritty work producing a television show — don’t really care who pays the bills, as long as there is money to be made. I knew it was only a matter of time before they started to see services like Netflix, Google Play and Amazon as potential partners in content creation.

Therefore I see no surprise at all that Netflix is going to be spending even more in the future creating exclusive content. With critically acclaimed series like House of Cards, I think they can see a great potential for content beyond the traditional, mainstream, broadcast networks. I would expect to see even more players enter this market, both in the existing ranks of high-tech businesses as well as new startups focused on becoming the next, great, content network.

You can read the complete story using the link in the show notes. 


Finally, for all you incipient content creators out there, TubeFilter provides a detailed article on the best days and times to post your videos for maximum viewership. If you are looking to turn your content into an on-going moneymaker, information like this can be critical. Moving the number of views 5% upwards could result in a significant boost in advertising earnings. As a fairly casual producer of YouTube content myself, I tend to post videos whenever I have time and whenever they are complete. After reading this article, though, I think I am going to spend a bit more time and consideration on my video release schedule. All the detailed tables and charts are available in the TubeFilter link in the show notes.

Want To Know The Best Days And Times To Post YouTube Videos? Here’s A Yearly Calendar.


Attracting Attention Yourself!

Ever since I first heard George Carlin’s comedy album, Class Clown, a certain phrase has always stuck with me… (paraphrasing) The job of a class clown is…ATTRACTING ATTENTION TO YOURSELF! I call this “Carlin’s Law of Attraction!” Replace class clown with any other profession and you will see the universal truth of that statement. Replace class clown with “podcaster” and you can probably see where I am headed.

Podcasting offers anyone the ability to “attract attention to yourself”, your business, your cause, whatever is important to you. Sure, it can be difficult to rise above all the other folks who have already discovered podcasting, but the odds are certainly much better than they ever were in the traditional media.

Carlin’s Law of Attraction, also dictates that you want your media spread as far and wide as possible. This means posting your videos to YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and any other spots where your audience might stumble across them. That said, each piece MUST have some links driving people back to your home site where they can subscribe to your content directly.

Everything depends on your ability to attract attention to your content. Scripts and books don’t sell themselves in your drawer (or trapped in your computer), art does sell when it sits in a closet and your podcast doesn’t attract an audience if no one ever gets to see it.

Apply Carlin’s Law of Attraction to everything you do, podcasting, writing, office work, whatever, and you will find that things just start to happen for you.


That’s it for this episode of New Media Interchange where I talk about the media world beyond mainstream television and radio, including podcasting, YouTube, live streaming, gaming and more.

New Media Interchange is part of the 3rd Pass Media network. For more information, visit 3rdPass.media. Do you have questions or comments? Send them along to NMI@3rdpass.media or via Twitter at @NMIPodcast .

I’m Douglas E. Welch and I’ll be back next week with more New Media news on New Media Interchange..

Filed under: Audio, New Media, News, Opinion, Show, Technology, YouTube

New Media Gear 22: Blue Microphones Spark Digital Studio-Grade Condenser Microphone for Apple iPad and USB 2.0

New Media Gear 22: Blue Microphones Spark Digital Studio-Grade Condenser Microphone for Apple iPad and USB 2.0

I don’t often currently have the need to record high-quality audio to my iPad or iPhone, but I know a lot of podcasters who record to their mobile devices as a matter of course. The Spark would certainly add a level of quality to mobile recording while removing the need for mixing boards, phantom power and other encumbrances that make location recording difficult. The Spark plugs directly into the data connection of both older iPads using the 30-pin connector and also newer units with Apple’s Lightning Connector.

I have always liked Blue’s products, including a Blue Snowball that I currently own, and the Spark looks like it could be another great product. 

Listen to audio samples from Blue Microphones web site

From Amazon.com…

  • Features Blue’s legendary studio condenser capsule and electronic components
  • iOS compatible with iPod touch (4th Gen), iPhone 4/4S, iPad/iPad2/iPad (3rd Gen)
  • Use the Apple Lightning Adapter (sold separately) for compatibility with iPhone 5, iPad (4th Gen), and iPad Mini
  • Work with Garage Band and other recording applications
  • Focus Control switch offers two sonic signatures in one mic, plus onboard control for volume, gain and instant mute
  • Headphone jack for zero-latency real-time monitoring

Click for more information and reviews on this product.

Blue Web Site

Previously on New Media Gear:

Filed under: Audio, Equipment/Gear, Hardware, New Media, New Media Gear, Technology, Voiceover

New Media Gear 21: Fancierstudio 3000 Watt Digital Video Continuous Softbox Lighting Kit

New Media Gear 21: Fancierstudio 3000 Watt Digital Video Continuous Softbox Lighting Kit

A few months ago we had need to purchase some equipment for a testimonial project and a series of interviews. First on our list was a basic set of video lights that would provide nice, basic illumination and still be easy to transport, as we would be shooting the interviews at the client sites. As we are just starting to move into the video production business (beyond my own personal productions) and not exactly knowing how far this line of work will take us, I didn’t want to invest thousands of dollars only to have to sell the equipment later for a loss.

Light kit

 

Click for more information on reviews on this product.

I did quite a bit of searching online and came across this kit on Amazon.com. I made a point of reading nearly every review available, both positive and negative to see how this kit might fit our needs. Overall the kit has a 4 star rating over 77 reviews. The one item I kept seeing in the reviews was the fact that this was, indeed, a “cheap” kit. That didn’t mean it didn’t work well, only that you had to be careful when setting up and tearing down and you couldn’t necessarily toss it around. Knobs are plastic, although the screws themselves are metal, the nylon bags holding the diffusion boxes are poorly stitched and things like that. Almost all the review said, though, that if you are looking for a good, entry-level kit, this could be it.

Based on these reviews, I ordered the kit and crossed my fingers that it would work out well. Once it arrived, we did a test setup here in the office so we understood how everything went together before we tried to do this under the time constraints of an actual shoot. It took a little time to learn exactly how to best put the lights together, but now that we have down 6 setups and tear downs, we are pretty good and can set up two lights in about 15 minutes.

Since we had the warnings from the reviews, we have been very careful to treat the kit with a light hand and try to keep the abuse to a minimum. These seems to have served us well, as nothing has broken or been damaged over the course of the last 2 months of transport and shoot.

Everything — stands, light bulbs, fixtures, diffusion boxes and screens — fits back into the original carrying case and allows us to move around quite easily from car to location to car. The kit is small enough that it easily fits in the trunk or back seat of all but the smallest vehicles.

Overall, we have been very satisfied in our purchase and while we may move up to more expensive (and expansive) equipment in the future, it has served us well as we grow. Go into this purchase with the full knowledge that is “cheap” and may require a little gentler care than most, but we have found it quite functional for, albeit limited, needs.

Previously on New Media Gear:

 

Filed under: Equipment/Gear, Hardware, New Media, New Media Gear, podcasting, Technology

New Media Gear 20: Headphone Recommendations

New Media Gear 20: Headphone Recommendations

My old — and rather inexpensive — set of headphones are on their last legs, and since I am moving into more on-location video production I decided I needed at least one new pair. I put out the call for headphone recommendations on both the Podcast Community Group on Facebook and the Podcasters list on Yahoo. As usual, I received a host of great recommendations.

For the time begin, I picked up a rather inexpensive pair of headphones at the local Radio Shack store as I had a discount coupon available and they are nearby. These will get me by for a while and I will continue checking out all the further recommendations for a more expensive set for the future.

Radio Shack: AUVIO® Foldable Headphones

Auvio headphones

Read the main conversation on the Facebook Podcast Community in this thread.

Headphone recommendations:

From this list, I am leaning towards the Sony headphones.  I have used them professional environment before and liked both their sounds and their fit. It was great to be reminded of them as a possibility.

Previously on New Media Gear:

 

Filed under: Hardware, New Media, New Media Gear, Technology

Video: New Media Tip – Scheduling Blog Posts with WordPress and Blogger

Sometimes it can be useful to schedule blog posts to go out on a specific date and time. For example, you might be on vacation or away from your office, but still want that content to go out. Both WordPress and Blogger provide support for scheduled posts and this video shows how to use it.

 CINM thumb scheduling

 Can’t see the video above? Watch “New Media Tip – Scheduling Blog Posts with WordPress and Blogger” on my YouTube Channel.

Watch more New Media videos in this New Media Playlist

Recent New Media Tips…

Filed under: Blogging, New Media, podcast, podcasting, Show, Software, Technology, Video, YouTube

My Favorite New Media Things for April 2013 – Douglas E. Welch

My Favorite Things

As always, let me know what types of interesting items you would like to see and I will keep an eye out for them especially. — Douglas

Links to all of these items, and more, are on my Pinterest Feed.

Follow Me on Pinterest

Filed under: Blogging, Hardware, My Favorite Things, New Media, podcasting, Software, Technology

Subscribed 35: Houzz.com

Subscribed 35: Houzz.com

Houzz screen

Houzz.com is one of my main sources for new thoughts on home and garden these days. I originally thought of it only as a way of finding home furnishing and design ideas, but I quickly discovered it also contains a huge amount of gardening and landscaping content, too. If you follow my social media accounts, you will find I am often sharing articles from Houzz.com. Sometimes these articles are about the design of a garden — both landscape and hardscape. At other times, there are great review articles of a particular type of plant or plants for specific uses and locations. This is one of the few sites where I subscribe to both the RSS feed and the Houzz.com Email Newsletter so I am sure to never miss a great article.

Houzz.com also has companion iPhone/iPad and Android apps for your mobile devices.

What are some of your favorite Subscriptions? Share them here in the comments!

Previously highlighted on Subscribed:

Subscribed is a Careers in New Media series  highlighting the Podcasts, YouTube Channels and Blogs that I follow on a daily basis. Check out this entry, and past entries, for some great New Media Content — Douglas

Filed under: New Media, Subscribed, Technology

Video Camera Recommendations Wanted – What do you like?

Updated: April 11, 2013, 1024pm PDT

I posted this to Facebook and Twitter earlier, but wanted to include it here on the blog, too.

Camera Rec: Looking for HD cam with external mic input that records to SD Card. High consumer to low prosumer. Any thoughts?

I have some upcoming projects that call for an upgrade in my video camera equipment (and lights and microphones, etc), so I wanted to reach out to all of you to see what recommendations you might have. One of my main needs is some sort of external audio input for lavaliere and shotgun mics.

So far, I have received one recommendation over on Faceboook. I will add others as they come in. Be sure to chime in on the other recommendations if you have some further information or comments.

Many thanks for any help you can offer!

Recommendations so far:

Filed under: Equipment/Gear, Hardware, New Media, podcasting, Question and Answer, Technology

New Media Vocabulary: Widget/Web Widget

New media vocab logo

New Media Vocabulary: Widget

“In computing, a web widget is a software widget for the web. It’s a small application with limited functionality that can be installed and executed within a web page by an end user. A widget has the role of a transient or auxiliary application, meaning that it just occupies a portion of a webpage and does something useful with information fetched from other websites and displayed in place. Other terms used to describe web widgets include:[citation needed] portlet, web part, gadget, badge, module, webjit, capsule, snippet, mini and flake. Widgets are typically created in DHTML, JavaScript, or Adobe Flash.

Widgets often take the form of on-screen device (clocks, event countdowns, auction-tickers, stock market tickers, flight arrival information, daily weather etc.).” — Wikipedia.org

Widgets are an important part of any web site these days. Myself alone I use widgets of some sort on nearly any page of my blogs or web site. I use them to link to Amazon books, cookbooks from Cookbook Cafe, show off my Twitter follower, Facebook or Google+ follower numbers and much more. Widgets allow anyone, regardless of their prowess with HTML, include high-end (and very useful features) on their web sites without having to write their own programs.

YouTube videos which are embedded in blogs and web sites are another great use for a “widget.” Bloggers need only copy the provided code from YouTube and then paste that code into their pages or blog post.  These “embeds” allow the easy spreading of content while still rewarding the original content creator.

For more information on Widget/Web Widget:

Previously on New Media Vocabulary:

Filed under: Blogging, New Media, New Media Vocabulary, Technology

New Media Tip: Linking and Embedding specific sections of a YouTube video

When sharing YouTube videos, we often just link to the entire video and let people decide what they want to watch. While this is fine for short videos, sometimes we would rather refer people to just a specific portion of a much longer video. Perhaps we are highlighting a quote, tip or idea.

YouTube provides some basic tools for specifying a start time when linking or embedding a video, but with the addition of a few parameters to the video URL, you can direct viewers to a very specific segment.

For example, if you are linking or embedding a video, you will see these options on the YouTube page:

Youtube link 1

If you check the checkbox, you can either enter in a time, or the time will be taken from the point where you are currently viewing in the video.

This results in a URL in the form of: http://youtu.be/E-GekEZOwLQ?t=11m54s . The video will start playing at this point and continue unit the end.

If you want want to specify both a start and end time, then you will need to add a few different parameters to the YouTube URL.

http://www.youtube.com/v/%5Bvideo_id%5D&start=%5Bstart_at_second%5D&end=%5Bend_at_second%5D&version=3)

In this example, you would need to replace the bracketed sections above with the appropriate settings.

http://www.youtube.com/v/E-GekEZOwLQ&start=714&end=760&version=3

This could link people to the appropriate video, launch it full screen and start playing at the appropriate spot when they click Play.

To embed a video in your blog or web page which does the same thing, you can include the start and end parameters in the standard YouTube iframe embed code.

First, copy the standard embed code from the YouTube video page:

Youtube embed 1

Then add the start and end parameters, so that the code looks like this:

..and here is the resulting YouTube video…

While making these embeds of specific video section does require adding a little information to the standard embed, it should be straightforward enough for anyone to accomplish.

Do you have further questions about YouTube linking and embedding? Add your questions and comments below and I will add additional information.

Filed under: Blogging, New Media, New Media Tips, Software, Technology, Tips, Video, YouTube

New Media Gear 016: Peter Lythgoe of Zzipp and Co. Podcast from Weymouth, UK (Part 3 of 3)

New Media Gear 016: Peter Lythgoe of Zzipp and Co. Podcast from Weymouth, UK (Part 3 of 3)

Peter is the producer and host of the Zzipp and Co. Podcast and uses a variety of equipment in producing his shows. He was kind enough to break out his equipment in 3 parts, including hist audio studio equipment, his video interview equipment and the equipment for the video studio he is currently building. Since her has so much equipment to share, I will present his New Media Gear in 3 parts, too. This posts details Peter’s studio equipment.

New Media Equipment:

If you have any questions about Peter’s podcasting equipment, please drop them in the comments or in the Facebook Podcasting Community.

Previously on New Media Gear:

 

Filed under: Equipment/Gear, Hardware, New Media, New Media Gear, podcasting, Technology

New Media Gear 015: Audio-Technica ATR2100-USB Cardioid Dynamic USB/XLR Microphone

New Media Gear 015: Audio-Technica ATR2100-USB Cardioid Dynamic USB/XLR Microphone

I first heard about this microphone from Richard Cleveland over at Naked Ape Productions during one of his Podcast U panel discussions. I mentioned this microphone to my personal friend,  Michael Lawshe, who is an expert in all things audio (and multi-Emmy Award winner) and he happened to drop one by when we met for dinner last night.

First Impressions: Audio-Technica ATR2100-USB Micrphone - 12

First Impressions: Audio-Technica ATR2100-USB Micrphone - 4First Impressions: Audio-Technica ATR2100-USB Micrphone - 6First Impressions: Audio-Technica ATR2100-USB Micrphone - 8

First Impressions: Audio-Technica ATR2100-USB Micrphone - 14First Impressions: Audio-Technica ATR2100-USB Micrphone - 10

The microphone package include the mic itself, a mic clip and small plastic mic stand, an XLR microphone cable and a USB cable. As you might notice from the cables included, the ATR2100-USB, has a special feature which I have not seen in many other microphones. Instead of being a USB-only mic like the Blue Snowball or Rode Podcaster, the ATR2100 includes connections and electronics so it can be used either as a USB microphone connected directly to your computer with out a mixing board or as a standard dynamic microphone connected via XLR to a mixer.

This dual connectivity makes this a great mic for those who are just getting started in podcasting or other audio recording and yet allows them to step up to a mixing board and other equipment while still using the same microphone. Additionally, when recording with USB-only microphones, real time monitoring of your recording can be a problem due to the USB induced processing delay. The ATR2100-USB works around this issue by including a headphone jack directly on the microphone itself, so you can easily monitor in real time even when connected via USB. Other USB microphones have included this much needed feature in the past, such as the Rode Podcaster, and it is great to see other manufacturers alleviating the monitoring issue with their designs. I know for myself that it is very important to be able to monitor myself as I record. It helps me to catch mumbled words, overly fast speech and poor pronunciations which I might not notice otherwise.

As a demonstration, I have recorded this blog post as an audio podcast, too, so you can hear the microphone in a real world situation using both the USB and XLR modes.

Listen to this microphone demonstration

[powerpress]

Everything up to here has been recored using the USB connection on the ATR2100. Now I will switch to the XLR connection using my small mixing board.

As with any handheld mic, shock isolation js important. You don’t want to pick up any noise from your hand on the microphone itself. This is often where many less expensive microphones and recorders with built-in mic fail greatly. As you can hear, I am moving the microphone around in my hand and while it is picking up a bit of noise, if you hold the mic firmly you might not notice it at all. The included plastic mic clip and tabletop mic stand is enough for most beginners to get started, although most would probably want to move up to a more robust, metal, stand fairly quickly.

Unfortunately, the headphone level form the microphone was at a very low level for my own personal tastes. I would prefer much more volume when recording and playing back what I have recorded. The mic has a headphone volume control, but it did not seem to the effect the output volume much at all. Instead the volume control seemed to be trying to change the overall volume on my Macintosh.

The recording level was quite good even when placed on a desktop at some distance from my mouth. If you want more input level, of course, you can move closer to the mic although then you would want to use a pop filter cut down on the popping sounds of consonants and plosives like P’s and B’s. In this podcast I have used the mic at a fairly close proximity and included the use of a pop filter.

Based on my short time with the microphone, and recommendations from others, I would consider this a great microphone for its price. Amazon currently lists it for around $40 US. I have been impressed with the overall recording quality even here in this rough demonstration. I haven’t taken any time to really adjust the microphone in any way, but simply plugged it in, adjusted the recording level and made this recording using Apple’s GarageBand software.

If you’d like more information on the ATR2100-USB, you can find links not the web site as part of this blog post. Visit DouglasEWelch.com/newmedia/ to find them.

Audio-Technica ATR2100-USB Cardioid Dynamic USB/XLR Microphone

Product Features from Amazon.com:

  • Handheld dynamic microphone with USB digital output and XLR analog output
  • USB output connects to your computer for digital recording, while the XLR output connects with your sound system conventional microphone input for use in live performance
  • Smooth, extended frequency response ideally suited for podcasting, home studio recording, field recording, voiceover, and on-stage use
  • Built-in headphone jack allows you to directly monitor your microphone output without audible delay
  • Cardioid polar pattern reduces pickup of unwanted sounds from the sides and rear
  • Dynamic Microphone With Usb Digital Output & Xlr Analog Output
  • Usb Output Connects To Computer For Digital Recording, While The Xlr Output Connects With Sound System’S Conventional Microphone Input For Use In Live Performance
  • Built-In Headphone Jack With Volume Control

If you have any questions about Peter’s podcasting equipment, please drop them in the comments or in the Facebook Podcasting Community.

Previously on New Media Gear:

 

Filed under: Audio, Equipment/Gear, Hardware, New Media, New Media Gear, podcast, podcasting, Show, Technology

New Media Vocabulary: Noise Floor

New media vocab logo

New Media Vocabulary: Noise Floor

While I have linked to some much more technical descriptions of noise floor below, for me (and I assume the average new media producer) the noise floor is the base level of noise in your recording environment. For me, this includes ambient wind noise outside my windows, the hiss of the pilot light on my gas fireplace, fans on my computers and probably a thousand other small noise sources I don’t even notice on a daily basis. All of these combined create my “noise floor”.

The noise floor is the overall hiss or buzz you hear in your recordings and in some worst scenario cases, it can almost overwhelm the “signal” you are trying to record i.e. your voice, your music, etc. The noise floor is also an issue when you find that you have recorded at too low a level and try to raise the overall volume of the recording to an acceptable level. Unfortunately, raising the overall level also amplifies the noise that was recorded beneath your voice or music. In the worst case, this noise will be so overwhelming that you will not be able to use the recording at all. Yet another reason to insure that you are recording at an optimal level when producing your audio or video podcasts.

You always want to try and reduce your ambient noise as much as possible, but without a professionally designed recording studio, there will be limits on how much noise you can prevent, so careful management of recording levels is a must.

For more information on noise floor:

Previously on New Media Vocabulary:

Filed under: Hardware, New Media, New Media Vocabulary, podcasting, Technology

New Media Gear 013: Charles McFall, Co-host “Success Freaks”

New Media Gear 013: Charles McFall, Co-host “Success Freaks”

Success freaks

Since its inception in 2011, The Other Side of LIVE! (TOSOL) has lived up to its hype as a comedic motivational talk show. A two-year Podcast Award nominee, TOSOL entertains & edifies with its hosts’ captivating sense of humor and positive, thought-provoking content. With the show’s theme of “helping others be awesome,” TOSOL covers everything from branding your passion to dealing with death to surviving bullies. TOSOL’s R. Mordant Mahon & Charles McFall succeed in giving both mind & spirit something to chew on while putting enough laughter in your heart to make you smile out loud.
 
 
Charles shares his New Media Gear with us in this issue of New Media Gear. 

New Media Equipment:

 Reaper 

If you have any questions about Charles’ podcasting equipment, please drop them in the comments or in the Facebook Podcasting Community.

Previously on New Media Gear:

 

Filed under: Equipment/Gear, Hardware, New Media, New Media Gear, podcasting, Software, Technology

Elsewhere: Jim Long on The How and Why of Live Web Video Streaming

Streaming live

Jim provides a great article on live streaming, what to use and who to prepare. Check it out!

The How and Why of Live Web Video Streaming

While live video broadcasting is within the reach of anyone with high-speed broadband, “live” poses unique technological and performance challenges.  Senator Marco Rubio’s parched, water break delivery of the GOP response to the State of the Union will be remembered as a short-lived Poland Spring internet meme.  But what it really demonstrates is just how difficult it can be to connect to millions, in the solitude of a dark empty room through the unforgiving, unflinching lens of the live TV camera.  Live web video streaming can be equally daunting.  In this post, we’ll look how it’s getting done in the real world and how you can make it work for you.

Read the entire article

 

More about Jim?

“I’m a veteran, Washington, DC based, network news cameraman currently working for one of the original three broadcasters.  I’m also an entrepreneur and I started Verge New Media, LLC because I see opportunity where others see challenge in the media industry.  Verge New Media is my “side hustle”, something any savvy legacy media worker should have.”

See Jim’s full bio

Filed under: Elsewhere, New Media, podcasting, Technology, Video

New Media Gear 012: Peter Lythgoe of Zzipp and Co. Podcast from Weymouth, UK (Part 1 of 3)

New Media Gear 012: Peter Lythgoe of Zzipp and Co. Podcast from Weymouth, UK (Part 1 of 3)

Peter is the producer and host of the Zzipp and Co. Podcast and uses a variety of equipment in producing his shows. He was kind enough to break out his equipment in 3 parts, including hist audio studio equipment, his video interview equipment and the equipment for the video studio he is currently building. Since her has so much equipment to share, I will present his New Media Gear in 3 parts, too. This post will start with Peter’s audio equipment.

New Media Equipment:

  Audacity logo 

Here is an interview I did with Peter about the special needs and specific uses of local podcasting:

If you have any questions about Peter’s podcasting equipment, please drop them in the comments or in the Facebook Podcasting Community.

Previously on New Media Gear:

 

Filed under: Equipment/Gear, Hardware, New Media, New Media Gear, podcasting, Technology

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